JERRY ANDRUS - (Bronze)
 (2010)
In Collection
#8
10*
Conjuring
Magic coin / token
Token / Coin 
Jerry Andrus token
(Bronze)

MT NUMBER: Not in Kuethe
LOCATION: Portland Oregon
DATE: 2010
OBV: Bust of Andrus with text around, Jerry Andrus-Honary Life Member-Society of American Magicians Assembly #59
REV: Andrus spiral illusion in center, with text around, Portland Society of Magicians - www.sam59portland.org
COMPOSITION: Bronze, 38-S


Product Details
Personal Details
Read It No
Location Magic Library (Home)
Condition Mint
Owner Bryan-Keith Taylor
Notes
Jerry Andrus

Born: January 28, 1918
Sheridan, Wyoming, United States

Died: August 26, 2007 (aged 89)
Albany, Oregon, United States

Education: Self-taught

Occupation: Magician, writer, inventor, scientific skeptic

Known for: Creator of world-renowned magic tricks and optical illusions

Religion: Agnostic

Website: http://jerryandrus.org/

Jerry Andrus (January 28, 1918 – August 26, 2007) was an American magician and writer known internationally for his original close-up, sleight of hand tricks and optical illusions, such as the famous "Linking Pins".

Contents
1 Early life
2 Career 2.1 Magic
2.2 Illusions
2.3 Skepticism

3 List of works 3.1 Books and lecture notes
3.2 Videos/DVDs

4 Media 4.1 Documentaries

5 See also
6 References

Early life

Andrus was born January 28, 1918 in Sheridan, Wyoming.[1] At the age of 10, he moved to Albany, Oregon, where he lived until his death in 2007. At 12, Andrus became interested in the art of illusion when he saw a performance of a reformed "spiritual medium".[2] He joined the International Society of Junior Magicians when he was 16 and soon became known as a "magician’s magician".[2]

Career

Magic

A self-taught magician, Andrus preferred to develop his own style rather than learn the craft as traditionally handed down from other magicians, eventually becoming one of the "best and most-influential 'close-up magic' performers ever."[1][3] He was known to many accomplished contemporary magicians, such as Lance Burton, Doug Henning, and Penn & Teller, for this unique brand of close-up, sleight-of-hand magic.[1]

International card magicians knew Andrus for his "Master Move", a sleight-of-hand classic "pass" without "necessary false movement".[4]

An early member of The Magic Castle in Hollywood, California, Andrus performed there semi-annually until shortly before his death.[1]

Illusions

Andrus created his illusions in his Oregon home, which he nicknamed "The Castle of Chaos" in reference to the numerous items he collected over the years with the hope of using them to "make something spectacular".[3][5]

In 1954, Andrus created the famous "Linking Pins",[2][6] a close-up illusion in which closed safety pins are rapidly linked together in twos, threes and chains.[7]

Skepticism

An avowed scientific skeptic and agnostic, Andrus often lectured at scientific and skeptic conferences, using his optical illusions and magic tricks to demonstrate the ease with which the mind can be fooled by the eye. He discussed a form of cognitive science that attempted to explain that because the mind is working on an unconscious level, it can be fooled into misperceiving apparently normal sensory experiences.[1]

List of works:

Books and lecture notes:
Andrus Deals You in (1956)
Sleightly Miraculous (1961)
Special Magic (lecture notes for 1974 Japan Tour) (1974)
More Sleightly Slanted (lecture notes) (1977)
Andrus Card Control (with Ray Hyman) (2000)
Kurious Kards and $5 Trix (2001)
Safety Pin-Trix

Videos/DVDs:
Jerry Andrus: A Lifetime of Magic – Volume 1 (2001)[8]
Jerry Andrus: A Lifetime of Magic – Volume 2 (2001)[8]
Jerry Andrus: A Lifetime of Magic – Volume 3 (2001)[8]

Media:

Documentaries:
A Thing of Wonder: The Mind & Matter of Jerry Andrus (2002)[9]
Andrus: The Man, The Mind and the Magic (2008)[1]

See also:
James Randi
Rudy Coby

References:

1.^ a b c d e f Neary, Robert; Smith, Tyson (October 24, 2008) (Documentary film). Andrus, the Man, the Mind & the Magic. Archived from the original on October 26, 2008. http://www.webcitation.org/5bs9QzyqW. Retrieved October 25, 2008.
2.^ a b c Randi, James. "Jerry Andrus". James Randi Educational Foundation. Archived from the original on October 25, 2008. http://www.webcitation.org/5bqXtughy. Retrieved October 25, 2008.
3.^ a b Raskauskas, Nancy (October 23, 2008). "The genuine magician". Corvallis Gazette Times. Archived from the original on October 25, 2008. http://www.webcitation.org/5bqdUb4g2. Retrieved October 25, 2008.
4.^ Greg, Edmonds. "Jerry Andrus". International Brotherhood of Magicians. Archived from the original on October 26, 2008. http://www.webcitation.org/5bsCfWi5Z. Retrieved October 26, 2008.
5.^ "Jerry Andrus". SandLotScience.com. Archived from the original on October 25, 2008. http://www.webcitation.org/5bqaY5epZ. Retrieved October 25, 2008.
6.^ "Magicians' Biographies". Magictricks.com. Archived from the original on October 26, 2008. http://www.webcitation.org/5bsEqt1oF. Retrieved October 26, 2008.
7.^ "Linking Pins". Magictricks.com. Archived from the original on October 26, 2008. http://www.webcitation.org/5bsFKmmDN. Retrieved October 26, 2008.
8.^ a b c "Jerry Andrus". Meir Yedid Magic. Archived from the original on October 25, 2008. http://www.webcitation.org/5bqkAXRRw. Retrieved October 25, 2008.
9.^ "A Thing of Wonder". Archipelago. Archived from the original on October 26, 2008. http://www.webcitation.org/5bs8wmNmg. Retrieved October 26, 2008.

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